Stand Out Snowdrops - is spring on its way?

February 08, 2018  •  Leave a Comment

Snowdrops in bloom at The Parish Church of St John the Baptist, Edge, nr Stroud, Gloucestershire - 08.02.2018Snowdrops in bloom at The Parish Church of St John the Baptist, Edge, nr Stroud, Gloucestershire - 08.02.2018Snowdrops in bloom at The Parish Church of St John the Baptist, Edge, nr Stroud, Gloucestershire - A carpet of snowdrops in full bloom at The Parish Church of St John the Baptist in Edge near Stroud, Gloucestershire - 08.02.2018

Picture by Carl Hewlett/SOS
2017 © Stand Out Studio Ltd

For sales or syndication visit www.standoutstudio.co.uk for more information

Stand Out Studio photographer Carl Hewlett stopped off at The Parish Church of St John the Baptist in Edge near Stroud, Gloucestershire while driving between shoots today, after spotting a blanket of snowdrops in the churchyard.

Snowdrops in bloom at The Parish Church of St John the Baptist, Edge, nr Stroud, Gloucestershire - 08.02.2018Snowdrops in bloom at The Parish Church of St John the Baptist, Edge, nr Stroud, Gloucestershire - 08.02.2018Snowdrops in bloom at The Parish Church of St John the Baptist, Edge, nr Stroud, Gloucestershire - A carpet of snowdrops in full bloom at The Parish Church of St John the Baptist in Edge near Stroud, Gloucestershire - 08.02.2018

Picture by Carl Hewlett/SOS
2017 © Stand Out Studio Ltd

For sales or syndication visit www.standoutstudio.co.uk for more information

Snowdrops flower between January and March, often appearing en masse and creating a characteristic ‘white blanket’ coverage. The species has long been associated with winter – the latin name, Galanthus nivalis, literally translates as ‘milk flower of the snow’. They thrive in lightly shaded woodland areas and can be found all around the UK.

Snowdrops in bloom at The Parish Church of St John the Baptist, Edge, nr Stroud, Gloucestershire - 08.02.2018Snowdrops in bloom at The Parish Church of St John the Baptist, Edge, nr Stroud, Gloucestershire - 08.02.2018Snowdrops in bloom at The Parish Church of St John the Baptist, Edge, nr Stroud, Gloucestershire - Snowdrops in full bloom at The Parish Church of St John the Baptist in Edge near Stroud, Gloucestershire - 08.02.2018

Picture by Carl Hewlett/SOS
2017 © Stand Out Studio Ltd

For sales or syndication visit www.standoutstudio.co.uk for more information
The white flowers hang from a single stem with three inner petals (called tepals) curved into a tight pointed oval and three external petals loosely opening outwards. These flower heads can be ‘single’ – one layer of petals – or ‘double’ – multiple layers of petals – headed. The grassy foliage is a vibrant light green.

There are more than 2,500 varieties and, although not a native species, they are now well established in the wild in the UK.

In British folklore; snowdrops have come to symbolize hope and purity. In modern medicine a naturally occurring substance within the plant, called galantamine, is used to help treat the symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease. However, the bulbs themselves are poisonous, a fact which perhaps lead to the superstition that a single snowdrop bloom in a house represents death.

Snowdrops in bloom at The Parish Church of St John the Baptist, Edge, nr Stroud, Gloucestershire - 08.02.2018Snowdrops in bloom at The Parish Church of St John the Baptist, Edge, nr Stroud, Gloucestershire - 08.02.2018Snowdrops in bloom at The Parish Church of St John the Baptist, Edge, nr Stroud, Gloucestershire - A carpet of snowdrops in full bloom at The Parish Church of St John the Baptist in Edge near Stroud, Gloucestershire - 08.02.2018

Picture by Carl Hewlett/SOS
2017 © Stand Out Studio Ltd

For sales or syndication visit www.standoutstudio.co.uk for more information

Info from Countryfile


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